Wind Energy in Korea

As one of the most viable alternative energy options so far, wind energy is growing at spectacular speed. With ambitious commitments by U.S, China, E.U and many other countries, “despite global downturn, global cumulative capacity grew by 31%, the highest annual increase for seven years”.(Economist, Blown away-China and America added most wind capacity in 2009, Feb 3rd 2010)

Wind in Korea, had not been an issue because of low level of technology, not enough quality for wind for generation. However, things are changed. Korea’s responsibility (as around 10th largest green house gas emission country) on reducing green house gas emission according to the Kyoto protocol, would become to be real in near future and this would have tremendous impacts on industries and economy. With increasing importance of enhancing energy security in national level, and as a new national economy growth driver wind energy become into spotlight in these days in Korea.

 For a little more understanding, let’s look over current issues related with Wind energy.
 The Federation of Korean Industries(FKI) suggested that wind energy industry should be more supported by national policy via its report on ‘Wind energy industry review and policy recommendation, 5.20.2009’.

 For most direct measure for wind energy generation development, FKI recommend increasing government incentive on wind energy generation. In current system, wind energy companies would receive 107.29won(9.33 cent) per kwh when they install larger than10kw facility.  FKI points out this had been set in 2006 and no more reflecting changed market condition since then.

FKI also suggest that there should be more incentive on offshore wind farm. With high and relatively consistent velocity of wind, efficiency of offshore wind farm will be 1.4 times greater than wind farm in land. Without many regulations on using land, it would be easier to build large size of wind farm. However, coupled with higher technical difficulty, no incentive from government increase risks and keep companies away from offshore wind farm investment.

 Also setting regulation on using certain level domestic parts on key product as mandatory for the technology development, more tax credit for R&D company and more business friendly approval processes.(which consist of 12 review process by 11 government agencies or departments.- Kihong Park, Green grow Korea)

With these actions, FKI reports tells wind energy would possibly create 17,000~25,000 job by 2030 if Korea will add 7.3GW capacity.  

Together with private sector’s increasing interests in wind energy, recognizing the importance of renewable energy, National energy committee chaired by Korean President announced Korea’s energy plan which increase renewable energy from 2.4% of total energy consumption in 2007 to 11% in 2030 in ‘20-year long term nation’s energy strategy’ (The Current Status and the Prospects of Wind Energy, by Moon-Seok Jang and Hyung-Joon Bang, Wind Energy Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research7 August, 2009). Coupled with industry level’s efforts, government’s drive for wind energy and proper policy to support wind energy sure will push wind energy.
Though several challenges (wind quality, noise, citizen’s protest, environmental disruptions and etc) still are there, wind energy would be major source for Korea’s energy and make Korea to contribute in saving our planet.  

[Reference]

 Economist, Blown away-China and America added most wind capacity in 2009, Feb 3rd 2010)

 FKI Issue paper – Wind energy industry review and policy recommendation, 5.20.2009

http://www.awea.org/faq/wwt_costs.html#How”>http://www.awea.org/faq/wwt_costs.html#How much does wind energy cost

 The Current Status and the Prospects of Wind Energy Moon-Seok Jang and Hyung-Joon Bang Wind Energy Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343, Korea

http://www.mke.go.kr
http://www.naenc.go.kr

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Wind Energy in Korea

  1. patrickpace

    It will be neat to see Korea become one the “green” energy players. 11% by 2030 doesn’t seem like a very aggressive goal, but probably very reasonable. I’m surprised to see a $0.09/kwh incentive, that is pretty significant. Neat.
    Patrick

  2. axelgerdau

    Hey! I love that Korea is now pushing for wind power development as well. If you get the chance this summer, stop by Roscoe, Texas, an hour West of Abelene. There E.On has just finished what is still — I believe — the world biggest wind warm with (according to Wikipedia) 627 wind turbines and a total installed capacity of 781.5 MW. That surpasses the nearby 735.5 MW Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center. The project cost more than $1 billion and provides enough power for more than 250,000 average Texan homes. Apparently, the wind farm area spans parts of four Texas counties and covers nearly 100,000 acres, several times the size of Manhattan. If you don’t have the time to go out there, check out this wonderful (and short) multimedia slide show by one of NPR’s best reporters, Austin’s own John Burnett:
    http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/2007/nov/texas/slideshow/index.html

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